Posts tagged ‘Kigali’

May 28, 2015

Africasan4: Ngor declaration aims to eliminate open defecation by 2030

Rising from the three day 4th African Sanitation and Hygiene Conference tagged “AfricaSan4″ African leaders  have  issued the “Ngor Declaration on Sanitation and Hygiene” which aims to achieve  universal access to adequate and sustainable sanitation,  safe hygiene services and eliminate open defecation by 2030.

They also reaffirmed their commitment to the human right to water and sanitation for all for all Africans, and pledged to work towards progressively  eliminating inequalities that currently deny about 547m people in Africa access to safe sanitation.

Another major highlight of the declaration is a commitment by countries to fund sanitation and hygiene budget to a minimum of  0.5% of GDP by 2020.

The triennial AfricaSan organised by the African MinistersCouncil on Water  (AMCOW) aims to address Africa’s sanitation challenge including helping agencies and governments shape strategies for action at many levels.  Mainly attended  by sanitation technical experts, it provides a forum to to exchange lessons, to identify approaches and technologies that work best in their local circumstances.  This 4th AfricaSan water held in Dakar, Senegal, this week.

Text of the Ngor Declaration on Sanitation and Hygiene” Adopted by the African Ministers responsible for sanitation and hygiene on 27 May 2015 at AficaSan4

Preamble
We, the Ministers and Head of Delegations responsible for sanitation and hygiene in Africa, together with senior civil servants, academics, civil society, development partafricasan4ners and private sector at the 4th African Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene (AfricaSan), convened by the Government of Senegal with support from the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW) in Dakar, Senegal, May 25-27, 2015

  1. Recognizing that while an estimated 133 million people living in Africa gained improved sanitation since 1990, the level of progress has not kept pace with demograpic change; many countries do not have adequate high-level leadership, financial and human resources to implement existing policies, fail to tackle equity, do not build, manage or maintain sanitation system and services, or create the large-scale hygiene behaviour change;
  2. Mindful that an estimated 61% of people living in Africa do not have access to improve sanitation and that 21% still defecate in the open;
  3. Noting that this lack pf access to improved sanitation together with poor hygiene practice result in a huge burden of disease and that the associated economic, human,social,health and environmental costs are a major burden on African countries;
  4. Reaffirming the human right of safe drinking water and sanitation for all;
  5. Welcoming the aspiration of the draft Sustainable Development Goals which include an explicit target to “By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and an end to open defecation, paying special attention to the need of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations” committing to integrating these in national policies and plans;
  6. And recognizing that the time has come to incorporate the lesson from the eThekwini commitments and replace them by the “Ngor Declaration on Sanitation and Hygiene”, setting out in particular clear indicator for monitoring progress;

The Vision articulated by African Ministers responsible for Sanitation and Hygiene at African 4, Dakar, Senegal, is summarized below:
Achieve universal access to adequate and sustainable sanitation and hygiene services and eliminate open defecation by 2030.
Commitments
To realise this vision, our governments commit to:-

  1. Focus on the poorest, most marginalized and unserved aimed at progressively eliminating inequities in access and use and implement national and local strategies with emphasis on equity and sustainability;
  2. Mobilise support and resources at the highest political level for sanitation and hygiene to disproportionately prioritize sanitation and hygiene in national development plans.
  3. Establish and track sanitation and hygiene budget lines that consistently increase annually to reach a minimum of 0.5%GDP by 2020;
  4. Ensure strong leadership and coordination at all levels to build and sustain governance for sanitation and hygiene across sectors especially water, health, nutrition, education, gender and the environment;
  5. Develop and fund strategies to bridge the sanitation and hygiene human resource capacity gap at all levels;
  6. Ensure inclusive, safely-managed sanitation services and function hand-washing facilities in public institutions and spaces;
  7. Progressively eliminate untreated waste, encouraging its productive use;
  8. Enable and engage the private sector in developing innovative sanitation and hygiene products and services especially for the marginalized and unserved;
  9. Establish government-led monitoring, reporting, evaluating, learning and review systems;
  10. Enable continued active engagement with AMCOW’s AfricaSan process.

We further call on:

  1. All people living in Africa, especially the youth, to utilize and maintain sanitation and hygiene services with propriety and dignity;
  2. AMCOW to prioritize and facilitate adequate resourcing for sanitation and hygiene by mobilising dedicated, substantive new sources of financing;
  3. AMCOW to facilitate the establishment and management of systems and processes for performance monitoring and accountability against the Ngor Declaration;
  4. Training institutions in Africa to strengthen local capacity to deliver appropriate services in line with demand;
    research institutions in Africa to strengthen the evidence base and develop innovative locally appropriate solutions;
  5. Civil society in Africa to forge a cohesive, coherent and transparent vision and strategy to work with all stakeholders to achieve the Ngor Declaration;
  6. Traditional institutions, religious leaders and faith based organisations to strongly support equitable sanitation and hygiene activities in their communities;
  7. The private sector to increase its engagement in the entire sanitation and hygiene value chain to improve innovation and efficiency;
  8. Development banks, donors and partners to increase their support to government led efforts for universal access to sanitation and hygiene and to match this financial support with responsible accountable engagement.

And in recognition of this we make this declaration in Ngor, Dakar on 27th May, 2015,

 

July 22, 2011

Africasan3: Governments fail to make commitments

The Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com ended yesterday in Kigali, Rwanda, with Africa national governments reaffirming their commitments to implementing the eThekwini Declaration (2008).

The 42 African Ministers of water, health, environment and education that participated in Africasan3, also agreed on detailed action plans to address key blockages to progress in the sanitation sector, but failed to make financial commitments on allocating 0.5% of their national GDP to sanitation.

Read More: http://assemblyonline.info/?p=8215

 

July 20, 2011

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation awards $42 million for sanitation

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced $42 million in new sanitation grants that aim to spur innovations in the capture and storage of waste, as well as its processing into reusable energy, fertilizer, and fresh water. In addition, the foundation will support work with local communities to end open defecation and increase access to affordable, long-term sanitation solutions that people will want to use.

During a speech at the 2011 AfricaSan Conference in Kigali, Rwanda, “Sylvia Mathews Burwell, president of the foundation’s Global Development Program, called on donors, governments, the private sector, and NGOs to address the urgent challenge, which affects nearly 40 percent of the world’s population

“The grants announced Tuesday include $3 million toward a university challenge to develop a toilet that costs less than five cents a day without piped-in water, sewer connection or outside electricity.

With these new grants, the foundation’s commitment to Water, Sanitation & Hygiene efforts total more than $265 million.

July 20, 2011

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation reinvent the toilet

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation today announced the launch of a strategy called ‘Reinventing the Toilet’ to help bring safe, clean sanitation services to millions of poor people in the developing world.

Through this approach  the foundation and its partners are working to develop new tools and technologies that address every aspect of sanitation—from the development of waterless, hygienic toilets that do not rely on sewer connections to pit emptying to waste processing and recycling. Many of the solutions being developed by the Foundation involve cutting-edge technology that could turn human waste into fuel to power local communities, fertilizer to improve crops, or even safe drinking water.

In a keynote address at the 2011 AfricaSan Conference in Kigali, Sylvia Mathews Burwell, president of the foundation’s Global Development Program, called on donors, governments, the private sector, and NGOs to address the urgent challenge, which affects nearly 40 percent of the world’s population. Flush toilets are unavailable to the vast majority in the developing world, and billions of people lack a safe, reliable toilet or latrine.

“No innovation in the past 200 years has done more to save lives and improve health than the sanitation revolution triggered by invention of the toilet,” Burwell said in her speech at AfricaSan, the third African Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene, organized by the African Ministers’ Council on Water (AMCOW).

“But it did not go far enough. It only reached one-third of the world. What we need are new approaches. New ideas. In short, we need to reinvent the toilet.”

 

 

July 20, 2011

Audio Interview: Why $5m Global Sanitation Fund for Nigeria lies idle

Kigali July 20, 2011

In this audio interview, Barry Jackson, the Programme Manager of the Global Sanitation Fund explains why Nigeria has been unable  to access a $5m grant earmarked for the  implementation of  sanitation and hygiene promotion programmes in Cross River and Benue states.

Barry Jackson lamented that though Nigeria has access to huge local and foreign resources, it  does not always have a clear programme on how to implement sanitation and hygiene projects.

Jackson spoke to Babatope Babalobi during a Global Sanitation Fund ‘Sharing and Learning Event’ during the on going Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com

Listen to the interview here:

July 20, 2011

Africasan 3 pictures

 

Faces of Nigerians at the Africasan3, Kigali, Rwanda

July 20, 2011

WSSCC launches new WASH campaign

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) will launch a new  WASH Campaign today at the Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com

Speaking on  the campaign titled :  ‘GDP for GDP – Good Dignity Practices for Gross Domestic Product’, an official of the WSSSCC, Saskia Castelein, said the new advocacy will ‘empower WSSCC members and WASH advocates to communicate with governments to spread the message that there is an economic gain to be made from investing in sanitation and hygiene; and create a movement that champions the real value of safe sanitation across communities and constituencies – change mindset: sanitation challenge is not just a set of problems it offers many possibilities to improve to economic and social reality’

 

July 20, 2011

Media partnership in the WASH sector

The General Secretary of the General Secretary, West Africa WASH Journalists Network, Babatope Babalobi has urged stakeholders in the water and sanitation sector to effectively used the media to get their message across both to beneficiary communities and policy formulators.

He spoke at a capacity building working group during the Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com Kigali, Rwanda.

 

July 20, 2011

Africasan3 Sanitation meetings

Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA)  organised several working meetings during the

Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com

SuSanA is a network of organisations contributing to the achievement of the MDGs by promoting sanitation systems which take into consideration all aspects of sustainability, i.e. health and hygiene, environmental and natural resources, technology and operation, finance and economics, socio-cultural and institutional

For updates on the meetings visit:http://www.facebook.com/susana.org

 

July 20, 2011

Ecological Sanitation: Human excreta as nutrients

Human excreta contains valuable nutrients, and these nutrients can be used in valuable ways to solve accelerate group of valuable tress and crops.

-Peter Morgan on ‘Ecological Sanitation’ Presentation at Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) Working Group 5 meeting during the Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com . July 17, 2011

 

July 20, 2011

Yvonne Chaka promotes Handwashing with soap

Yvonne Chaka Chaka..yesterday in Kigali

 

South Africa’s Music star, Yvonne Chaka lighted up the Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3) www.africasan3.com Kigali, Rwanda, yesterday when she appeared at the Unilever-Lifebuoy behavior change programme.

The singer wearing a dark brown shirt and blouse with three rings of white beard necklaces, was resplendent and  cynosure of attention.

Myriam Sidibe, Global Social Mission Director of Lifebuoy, said Yvonne Chaka has been involved in promoting Unilever-Lifebuoy behavior change programme that cuts across multiple channels of mass, media, mother’s program and packaging.

 

July 19, 2011

CSOs call on African Governments to implement the Right to Water and Sanitation

Babatope Babalobi in Kigali, Rwanda

Representatives of civil society organizations in Africa have called on National Governments to urgently implement the Human Right to Water and Sanitation.

Rising from a one day Civil Society Forum in Kigali, Rwanda as part of the on going Africa Sanitation and Hygiene Conference 3 (Africasan3), http://www.africasan3.com,  the civil society organizations organized under platform of the  African Civil Society Network for Water and Sanitation (ANEW)  also called for a clear timetable and measureable targets for achieving expenditure of 0.5% of GDP on sanitation (as per the eThekwini Declaration); separate budget lines for sanitation spending in national budgets;  and better targeting of resources towards countries with low sanitation coverage and a higher burden of sanitation related diseases.

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