Posts tagged ‘washnews’

April 3, 2013

WASH Journalists hold AGM in Senegal

The 3rd annual general meeting of the  West Africa Water and Sanitation Journalists (WASH-JN) holds in Senegal, April 8-10, 2013.

About twenty eight Journalists reporting water supply and sanitation issues for Radio, Television, Newspapers and online media in 14 West Africa Countries will be attending the meeting organized with the support of WaterAid in West Africa and the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC)

The meeting will deliberate on in country activities of Institutional members of the WASH-JN-  the national Water and Sanitation Media Networks, progress reports on grant projects implemented by the member countries, as well as election of new officers  for the regional WASH media network.

Participating Journalists will also use the opportunity to some slum communities in Senegal to report on state of access to water supply and sanitation services.

March 19, 2013

African Development Bank hosts meeting on rural WASH in Tunis

                                                                                                               Babatope Babalobi

The African Development Bank (AFDB) will launch a new initiative to facilitate improved coordination and sector learning among partners and Stakeholders towards the achievement of the Bank’s Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Initiative (RWSSI), next week in Tunisia.

Known as  the ‘Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Initiative’s  Regional Coordination Committee (RCC)’,  the event will hold on March 26 and 27 at the Tunis head quarters of the Bank and will be attended by 150 – 200 experts representing all countries in Africa, as well as RWSSI stakeholders.

The Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Initiative (RWSSI), a joint programme coordinated by the AfDB but financed by many donors, other partners and Regional Member Countries (RMCs), was first launched in 2003 by the African Development Bank with an overall goal of achieving universal access to water supply and sanitation services for the rural populations by 2025 with an intermediate target of 80% coverage by 2015 in a sustainable way.

The Initiative seeks to help mobilize as well as facilitate the flow of available and potential resources to accelerate investment in Rural Water Supply and Sanitation (RWSS) in Africa, with goal to reach 80 percent coverage by the year 2015. The Initiative supports the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the reduction of poverty.

RWSSI was adopted in 2005 by AfDB’s main international development partners and African governments as a common framework, at the first International Conference on the RWSSI held in Paris April 1st, 2005.

The focus areas of the RWSSI include water supply, sanitation, hygiene, sector policy and strategy, capacity building and funds mobilization for Rural Water Supply and Sanitation sub-sector; and the Initiative targets about 280 million people living in rural Africa with access to new and rehabilitated water supply and sanitation (WSS) facilities.

According to an Internal Assessment of the AfDB’s water supply and sanitation initiative, “28 RWSS programs in 22 African countries have been approved, of which 16 have started to deliver water and provide sanitation services. The additional people served with access to water supply through the RWSS program rose from 1.15 million people at the end of 2007, to 32.63 million people at the end of 2010, while for sanitation it increased from 0.58 million to 20.09 million people, over the same period”

The overall objective of next week’s meeting in Tunis is to launch the platform that will facilitate improved coordination and sector learning among Partners and Stakeholders towards the achievement of RWSSI’s goals and targets.

The specific objectives of the meeting are: appraising stakeholders on RWSSI progress, achievements, challenges and plans leading to 2015. This will also include a discussion on some of the key issues affecting sector progress (sector monitoring and performance reporting; sub-sector financing; sustainability; sector coordination) and how Africa should address them; sharing country and field experiences in co-ordination to inform the way forward for RWSSI;  obtaining partner and stakeholder inputs towards identifying opportunities and addressing co-ordination challenges to achieve Africa’s rural water supply and sanitation targets; reviewing the draft terms of reference and membership of the RCC, and proposing undertakings for the first year (including modalities for their achievement); and, launching the RCC.

The meeting is expected to result in an enhanced understanding of the role, impact and contribution of RWSSI towards the achievement of Africa’s water and sanitation targets in rural and small town communities; greater awareness of key issues affecting sector progress and that are central to the mandate of the RCC.

These include sector performance monitoring and reporting, resource mobilization and sustainability of rural water supply and sanitation services, national level coordination, etc. climate change and adaptation, and how the RWSSI and the region is/should be addressing them;  and a better understanding of the need for co-ordination and a commitment to enhance this at regional and national levels.

December 3, 2012

Water related diseases ravage Taraba town

Ayodele Samuel +2348074420617, gtms06@yahoo.com

In Karim,  up to ten people are may be diagnosed of water related diseases daily, while A Medical Doctor says between two- five people die weekly of

Villagers scavenging water  from a 'stream'

Villagers scavenging water from a ‘stream’

diseases, Ayodele Samuel Ayokunle, Journalist and  blogger at www.ayodelenews.blogspot.com writes

My encounter on the road to Karim Village wasn’t a palatable experience for me, the Village had just been ravaged by the deadly flood that swept across the country, bad roads, fear of transportation on water coupled with visible angry flooded villagers. At last I landed in ‘Snake Island’. Karim Village, headquarters of  Karim- Lamido  Local Government  in  Taraba state, North East Nigeria.

It takes about  seven hours by road from Jalingo  the state capital, due to bad  roads and the  vastness of the land, but I  took less than 3hours  taking waterways using local boat from  River Lau, to  River Benue to  Jen and motorcycle  to Karim town.

Thou the people of karim Lamido are still battling the effects of flood that ravaged the rustic community, Typhoid and other water related diseases remains another nightmare.

Karim village known among visitors mostly Corps Members (a Nigeria government youth scheme for fresh graduates) as Snake Inland due to heavy presence of reptiles.

The town   is surrounded by water and thick grasses, which makes snakes a common sight , about four  different tribes (Karim jo , Jenjo, Bachama, Bambur) made up of the undeveloped Agrarian land with people majorly dealing in rice farming and fishing as source of livelihood.

Faced with lack of safe water despite surrounded by River Benue and Lau River, lack of toilets, the people of Karim despite their many problems, has its own uniqueness of peace and harmony  among its more than  195,844(2006 census)  Christians and Muslims who co-exist peacefully.
Water related disease affects the young and the old in Karim  because of their nomadic nature,  they tend to move from place to place in search of greener pastures for their immediate family, leaving behind available water source .

Major sources of water include rivers, ponds, and open wells which the inhabitants use for their domestic activities and every other water related activity.

Available boreholes are: a private owned borehole operated by RABI waters,that sells water especially to water vendors(mai-ruwa)  and one at the emirs palace are the only source of water to the people

Most Government sunk boreholes and the recently sunk ones under the Millennium Development Goals MDGs are no longer functioning due to what residents describe as “poor execution of the projects.”

A resident , Alhaji Abdullahi Umar said that sources of portable water were all blocked and most government boreholes are all dried, “we find it very difficult to have clean water for consumption and domestic use because most government water has dried up, so we drink from the ponds ”

However little or no assistance is available on the issue of healthcare, the community is armed with an unequipped primary health care center   to abate the water crisis facing the community.

According to, the Principal Community Health Officer(PCHO) of only Primary Health Centre, Karim Dr. Isa Nayin ,  typhoid and other gastro intestinal diseases like dysentery and diarrhea are prevalent in the locality. He said that these diseases is commonly reported from  remote areas which includes Karim- Mondi, Ruwan Fulani, Kwanchi and Mutum Daya, the villages about two hours motorcycle ride from the center.

Sighting the disease of the F’s (Faeces-Flies-Food-Finger) as the major vector of the disease,  Dr Isa stressed  that these diseases occur because there is no reliable source of water within the locality.

He estimated that 5-10 persons are daily diagnosis of water related cases in the hospital, while 2-5 died weekly of same illness, “ because the people still believe in traditional medicine so they usually don’t like visiting the hospital because of the cost and distance.”

Another problem facing the community is ‘Color change in water’  mostly especially in  the rural areas where different activities take place within the village ponds or rivers,  pigs are allowed to go play in drinking ponds thereby causing a dramatic change in the color of water  changing to red.

While a health worker Bumanda Andrew express fear considering the increasing casualties of water related diseases appealed to both local and state Government authorities to come to the aid of the community residents.

Government need to compliment  efforts of United Nations in providing social amenities to the less privileged, people here needs help on water and many other social problems”

Commenting on the water problem, Government official, the vice- chairman of Karim Lamido Local Government,   Alhaji Ahmad Umar Karim admitted that Government is  aware of the peoples plights but assures that efforts are made to reduce their hardship.

The government has done their best in terms of provision of portable water, citing example of a tap water pipe which were laid by the present Government across the local Government headquarters but which were suddenly vandalized by hoodlums without anybody reporting to the relevant authorities.”

Hand dug holes for  sourcing un safe water

Hand dug holes for sourcing un safe water

He said the people should complement Government efforts by protecting Government properties sited in their domain

The people of Karim are still hopeless on safe water, basic healthcare among other social amenities, where will respite come their way?

 

 

November 26, 2012

Amadou Lamine Dieng, Dg Onas, sur les boues de vidange : « Faire en sorte que les ménages bénéficient du biogaz et de l’éclairage »

Entretien réalisé par Idrissa Sané

Le directeur général de l’Office national de l’assainissement du Sénégal (Onas), Amadou Lamine Dieng a apporté des éclairages sur le démarrage prochain de la production de biogaz dans 3 nouvelles stations. Les Sénégalais, dit-il, seront les premiers bénéficiaires de cette source d’énergie.

L’atelier sur la production de biogaz vient de prendre fin. Que retenir d’essentiel ?
Nous sortons réconfortés de cette rencontre, parce que les communications sont de qualité. De plus, les échanges ont été enrichissants. Il ressort que les entreprises chinoises ont une bonne maîtrise du biogaz. Nous avons constaté que 75 % des habitants des quartiers utilisent les fosses septiques dans les départements de Pikine et de Guédiawaye. Dans cette zone, nous avons un projet financé par la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates. C’est un programme de restructuration de la vidange dans la banlieue. Les fosses septiques se remplissent et posent souvent des problèmes de traitement et de transport des boues. Dans le cadre de ce projet, nous sommes en train d’organiser la collecte, le transport et la valorisation de ces déchets. Nous voulons mettre les boues de vidange au service de la production du biogaz. Aujourd’hui, avec des échanges, nous avons des perspectives très intéressantes. Cela est en phase avec les orientations du président de la République, Macky Sall. Le gouvernement du Sénégal ambitionne, en effet, de porter à 20 % la part de l’énergie renouvelable dans notre consommation énergétique. Lorsqu’on parle d’énergie renouvelable, on ne peut pas oublier le biogaz. Donc, c’est une initiative qui est en phase avec les politiques publiques. Nous pensons qu’avec le soutien des Fondations, comme Bill et Melinda Gates, nous ferons beaucoup de choses dans ce domaine.
A quand le démarrage effectif du projet ?
Nous avons d’abord obtenu le financement. L’accord de don a été signé le 6 novembre dernier par le ministre de l’Economie et des Finances pour un montant de 3,6 millions de dollars américains. Cela est un atout à ne pas négliger. Nous voulons, à travers ce financement, affiner la recherche dans la technologie et construire une usine de production de biogaz. Nous avons déjà identifié le site à Tivaoune Peul. Nous ferons en sorte que le biogaz soit utilisé pour la consommation des ménages et l’éclairage. Il y a des recherches qui sont en train d’être faites.
L’Onas est-il techniquement prêt à s’orienter vers la production du biogaz ?
Nous sommes dans un cadre qui nous permet d’évoluer vers la production du biogaz. Nous ne partons pas du néant. Faudrait-il rappeler que le Sénégal a un programme national de biogaz ? Ce programme a été présenté. Ce sont des communications très pertinentes sur la problématique. Cette production doit se faire avec les boues de vache. Aujourd’hui, il y a 371 biodigesseurs installés dans les milieux ruraux. Ils sont utilisés pour la consommation des ménages en termes d’éclairage et de source d’énergie pour la combustion. L’Onas s’inscrit dans le Programme national de biogaz.
La gestion de trois stations sera affectée à des privés. Qu’est-ce qui justifie cette décision ?
La vocation de l’Office national de l’assainissement du Sénégal (Onas) n’est pas de faire des activités commerciales. On s’est rendu compte que, dans le cadre des stations de boues de vidange qui ont été réalisées, nous avions des relations quasi commerciales avec des vidangeurs. Pour mettre en place une organisation très forte, il faut que le secteur privé soit fortement impliqué. C’est ce qui explique notre démarche d’affectation des stations au secteur privé. Nous avons préparé des cahiers de charges pour intéresser les organisations à la gestion de ces stations. Ce sont les vidangeurs qui transportent les boues. Il ne faudrait pas qu’ils soient écartés de leur gestion. Nous avons lancé un appel d’offres pour que les trois stations qui seront construites, soient totalement privatisées. Les évaluations sont en cours et, très prochainement, la gestion sera transférée au privé.

November 7, 2012

Abuja residents in search of water, good sanitation

 

                                                                                                  Marcus Fatunmole , Abuja, Nigeria

Iddo is one of Abuja’s (Nigeria’s Federal Capital’s) sprawling satellite communities with about 30,000 residents in January 2012. The village is predominantly occupied by non-indigenes. While the natives are virtually farmers and artisans, the non-natives mainly work in the city while others engage in both artisanal and business activities.

Residents in search

Located few metres opposite the new site of University of Abuja, the community exists without significant infrastructure. The road leading to the village is ramshackle. With erratic electricity supply, residents of the community are most hit by acute water shortage. There is no functional public borehole even as the population of the University students living in the community keeps increasing, daily.

However, a public primary school with a separately-built junior secondary school, including a single-room police station are the only facilities bearing government presence in the settlement.

In April 2012, many houses in the village fell under the wheels of bulldozers of the Department of Development Control of the Federal Capital Territory (FCT). The Development Control had listed some villages along the airport road for demolition. Reason: structures in the villages, the Department claimed, did not get approval from the Federal Capital Territory, (FCT) administration. Iddo was unfortunately one of such communities. It was a period of multiple torments for the community. First, stench, oozing malodorous smell from different sections of the village blended with dust that enveloped the community, as the bulldozers tore down the structures.

Priscilia Jonah is a resident of the community, which currently has about 20,000 occupants. He told our reporter that “For those of us remaining in this place, we are not happy with the way people are managing their wastes. You see people dispose of domestic waste in the already blocked drainages. Every rainfall in this village is a threat because we are so close to the river. You know anything can happen should the flood refuse to get out of environment where houses are closely built near one another. I have always been afraid of the attitudes of our people. Go to their houses, many of them don’t have toilet. They defecate in the open. They litter everywhere with wastes. If you try to correct them, it will lead to quarreling.”

Iddo is no doubt one of the city’s communities that are on the precipice of environmental hazards. Since the community witnessed the rage of the FCT administration through its demolition exercise, many of the hitherto manageable problems have been compounded. Some persons who had dug boreholes in their homes before the demolition exercise have moved out of the village; while they left with the water equipment. The relics of fallen buildings in the village have also further disfigured the settlement. Files of fallen bricks are everywhere in the village; making them easy habitat for snakes, scorpion and other harmful reptiles.

Meanwhile, as houses of non-natives were mostly affected in the flattening exercise, many of the remaining houses in the community do not have basic toilet facilities. Many people, especially children defecate in the open. More worrisome are the polythene products that litter everywhere. Some of these products, which have been buried for years, surface whenever flood or heavy wind blows of the sand upon them.  

Like many settlements in Abuja, domestic animals contribute to growing filth in the community. There are goats, dogs, fowls and other domestic pets that move around the village unchecked. They defecate wherever they see and most often, no one cares to attend to those wastes. On many occasions, the wastes disappear with the flood, blown away by wind or trodden by residents.

Another major environmental disaster in the village is lack of motorable roads. Major roads in the village are footpaths which residents have forced their vehicles through. At every rainy season, these car owners find it difficult to drive their vehicles into their homes. The vehicles are usually parked at considerably “secured” places; sometimes in the homes of friends or neighbours.

There is a major river that flows across the farthest end of Iddo village. The natives usually find respite in this water, especially during the dry season. While the children have free bath in the river, the adults fetch it for domestic use. Meanwhile, this water dries up during the dry season. Then comes a great water challenge for the villagers. Many of them dig the dry channel to scoop water into their basins; even when such water is not safe for human consumption.

 On the other, in very few houses where borehole water is available for sale, it takes resident more than a day to get the water. Many of the residents keep broken basins at the borehole site to help determine when it would be their turn. In most cases, they do not get the water until the following day.

Another dimension to water crisis in this village is that while young men, popularly called “Meruwa”, who sell water in their wheelbarrows in the nation’s capital sell as low as N20 during dry season, challenge of bad road makes the persons who sell water in Iddo community increase the price even above N50 per 20 litres. The situation is also worse with the very few persons who sell through private boreholes to the community. They increase their prices at will.

November 6, 2012

WASH in School in Nigeria: findings of a Journalist

 By FRANCIS UMENDU ODUPUTE        

The school is overtaken by floods

Thursday, 27th September, 2012. 10:00a.m or thereabouts. Abies (not her real name) has just been asked out of the class. She had been down with illness and has not been in school for about a week and half now. Her peasant mother said the nurses at the health centre, (not too far from the school premises) had diagnosed stubborn malaria. But it looks like there is more to it than meets the eyes.

Abies managed to show up in school today but, midway between her classes, she began to throw up. The “Arithmetic Auntie” (subject teacher) had asked the 6 year-old girl to go out of the class so as not to vomit inside the jam-packed classroom, nor possibly infect the other pupils.

She had barely reached the corridor when her bosom friend and playmate, Kate (not her real name) also in primary 2, met her in an unusual position and gestures curiously. “… your belle dey pain you?” Kate queried her friend in pidgin English, meaning “…is your belly aching?’’. But Abies was busy battling for her life. She held her stomach a second time in split seconds and resumed her vomiting. “Doe o!”

Flooded school presmises

Kate quipped in vernacular, meaning “sorry!” “Your belle dey pain you?” She asked a second time, inquisitively. “No. E dey turn me and I dey feel cold”, Abies managed to reply at last but instantly resumed the battle for her health. Just then my camera’s lenses clicked to record the ensuing drama from my (investigative) “hide out”.

There is an apparent state of emergency here!

The rains this year have refused to stop and  the daily misery, environmental /health hazards and pains borne by inhabitants and indigenes of this large community and their immediate neighbours in Egor Local Government Area, Edo State,  South South Nigeria, are now a normal ritual and culture of sorts; and if the predictions by environment and climate change experts are anything to be taken serious, next year’s rains and its resultant flooding , erosion menace and health havoc should be worse than this year’s experience – just as this year’s rains and its resultant floods have eclipsed the 2011 flood furies in this part of the state.

Alas! Here at Evbuotubu Community, the worst hit victims are school children; and unless something urgent and drastic is done now by all relevant stakeholders, the gradually submerged school buildings may soon collapse on the helpless children and their teachers. Or, at least, an imminent epidemic might break out sooner or later. Why? How?

Open urination by a pupil

Minutes earlier, I was heading to the office of the headmistress of the second arm of the school, to book an appointment. The office was in the middle of a block of four classrooms, and walking across the first two classrooms to her office was very revealing.

Dutiful teachers were busy teaching and writing on the chalk boards or marking books on their tables while enthusiastic kids- some of whom sat on the muddy wet floor for want of chairs to sit on – listened with rapt attention while others were too busy copying notes to notice a visitor’s presence by the corridor.

As I approached the door of the school head, pungent smell filled the atmosphere around me. I looked around the erosion-ravaged premises and the large pools of water around, looking for any dead animal in the flood water.

Just then I noticed at the extreme end of the building- about half a pole from the school head’s office- an abandoned school latrine overtaken by weeds and flood water; (obviously out of  use because of the erosion, the flood may have washed ashore the faeces inside the abandoned latrine onto the surface).

 “Good morning, everybody!” I politely greeted two elderly ladies chatting away in the office. “Please is this the headmistress’ office?” The fair lady seated at the far end of the room immediately responded in affirmation and reciprocated my greeting in a friendly and receptive manner, while her dark complexioned colleague seated by my right hand just kept starring at me as if  I was a tax collector or one of those “area boys”.…

“I am a journalist… and also a resident of this community. I use to have my child in this school but she has passed out…” I began introducing myself and my mission. “

More floods

I have been greatly concerned about the state of things in this school for a long time now but I decided to come and see what I can do to help draw the attention of those concerned in government to the plight of children in this school, even though I know there may have been various efforts regarding this in the past…”

Did you say your child is in this school?” the fair lady queried me. “She used to be in this school but she passed out two years ago and now she is schooling in Asoro Grammar school” I replied and continued.

“I wanted to see the Headmistress to seek the cooperation of the school authority to carry out some research and investigation on the way this yearly flooding is impacting daily on the pupils and their academics, and to ask a few questions regarding what currently the school has done or is doing to make the government speed up efforts to keep their promise…”

While her mate just kept looking at me as though waiting to cross examine me, the fair lady cut in, “oh that’s good… you’re welcome. The headmistress just left some minutes ago to their office in town but she will soon be back. You can still speak with her (pointing to the dark lady), she’s the vice. My God! The same woman who has refused to give me a welcome look or say anything to me was the very one I have to speak to! I took pluck, anyway, and eyeballed her.

“You’re a journalist, what kind of cooperation are you expecting from us?” she asked intimidating and suspiciously. “Well, I would like the school authority to permit me to observe the experiences of the school children under this heavy flooding they learn in and to take some photographs, ask you people a few questions – like how is the daily flooding of the school premises affecting the children and teachers academically and health – wise; are mosquitoes and other insects affecting the pupils and teachers in the classes as a result of the flooding, is the situation affecting the attitude and input of teachers to work as well as their health? All these will help me in my report about what is going on here in this school”. I explained.

Have you been in this community or you just came newly?” the Vice Headmistress queried me again. I was yet to answer when she dropped a bombshell, “you see that I have been very reluctant to talk all this while, because it’s like you’re a stranger here. You see, I’m somebody that doesn’t like wasting my time in what will never work”. At this point I became confused and curious. Is she implying I’m on a futile mission?

“Madam, how do you mean?” I politely asked. Then she opened up: “If you are old in this community you will know that the main problem of this school is the community and their leaders. In all my 33 years as a teacher I have been transferred to several communities. I have never seen a community that hates to develop.

Here you have a problem that has deteriorated for several years, and yet you couldn’t do anything about it as a community, instead you are adding to the problems. All they are good and fast at is recklessly selling lands without considering the impacts on the land. They keep selling off lands indiscriminately…”

She continued, “Anywhere in the world whenever you want to sell community lands, you first of all consider three basic things: you consider school, market and hospital – these basic essential needs of the people. But here, the community leaders and the people don’t care about all of these provided they get money.

And you were asking me you want to find out if mosquitoes bite pupils and if teachers are comfortable working under this condition. I think such a question should not arise at all. From my little knowledge of elementary science, we were taught the various reproduction stages of mosquitoes breeding and multiplying and we were taught that pools of standing water is the breeding ground for mosquitoes, how much more this river and lake of erosion that has taken over the entire school compound for several years.

“So, I’m surprised that such a question is coming from an enlightened person like you, a journalist for that matter. You also talked about how it is affecting teachers … you can see me now, I’m sitting here with hands folded. Because I’m feeling cold and you don’t have to be told that a major part of the reason is because the whole premises are filled with water. What do you expect? Anyway, we are willing to give you the cooperation you asked for but the headmistress, as you have been told, is not a round now. Except you wait or come back another time”.

 

The Deputy school head may be right – as I later got to discover, the flooding situation at the Evbuotubu Primary School has entered its 12thyear, but there is nothing to show that help is in sight for these children. Year after year they learn under mosquitoe-infested environment. Their entire school premises have been overtaken by flood and bushes. The school buildings are gradually submerged in flood water.

School latrine overtaken by weeds and flood water

More embarrassing is the fact that without a single rebuke from any teacher or school head, these children daily urinate freely on the flood water and everywhere around the few plain spots of land that show up on the school compound once the flood water wanes a little; and they in turn swim in the infected water, eat food and snacks that fell on the infected ground, and  inhale all the stench and putrid odors emanating from the accumulated urine (and excreta) all around the smelly environment.

They have no access to drinking water, no functional latrine and no playing field for recreation. And because children MUST play, they have turned private properties in adjoining streets/ roads and people’s compounds around the community  to their playing fields  and gadgets without any checks from the  school authorities.

Obviously out of the view and control of the school authorities, many of these pupils get injured in the process,  ill-influenced and some times even bullied or abused by some bad elements in the community with  much impunity.

The negative impact of the situation on the health, psychology, self esteem of these children at Evbuotubu primary school in Egor Local Government Area of Edo state, Nigeria,  and indeed the overall academic output and effectiveness of both teachers and pupils are underscored by the recurrent cases of  pupils’ absenteeism  truancy, illnesses like malaria and other water-related diseases such as that which  Abies and many other children in the school daily have to contend with. Alas! Who really cares?

And how am I sure I’m not already embarking on yet another “fruitless” exercise, as the deputy school head has predicted?

The story is published under the pro poor WASH stories project implemented by the Water and Sanitation Media Network Nigeria, with the support of West Africa WASH Media Network, WaterAid, and Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council.

November 2, 2012

Laaniba: where residents defecate, bath, and drink in River Ajibode

 

                                                                              By ‘Fisayo Soyombo

The sight of roaming goats depicted a typical village setting.The muddy houses, the types found in the remotest of villages possible, lent an air of rurality to the locality, too, their openings for wooden windows intercepting the even splash of mud on the walls. Many of the houses were roofed with iron sheets that had caved in to pressure from several years of overuse, and their decolorized frames were fragmentizing and falling off the walls they were supposed to protect.

In the heat of the ruthless descent of the scorching sun, two ladies tiredly slowed their steps as they approached their huts,bending down to lower the water pots on their heads and wiping their haggard faces with a piece of lace cloth that had previously served as a handkerchief. Those two were just some of the unlucky lot who regularly trekked long distance to fetch water at a river outside the community, in the absence of a single public tap bearing pipe-borne water.

Ordinarily, the people of Laaniba, under Akinyele Local Government in Ibadan, Oyo State, ought to be too developed to be grappling with water, housing, and electricity challenges, considering the community’s proximity to the University of Ibadan, Nigeria’s premier university. In fact, the Ajibode River is its only real separation from the varsity, the rest being a long, straight stretch of road.

Pa Joshua Olatunji, head of the community whose age was said to be in excess of 100 years, spoke on the problems of the people. “Our road is very useless even though it is better than it was some years back. Whenever it rains, bicycle and motorcycle riders will have a hard time navigating it while cars many times get stuck for days,” he said, removing his cap in a move that amplified the smallness of his body frame.

Replacing his cap, he continued, “We do not have potable water. We drink from the river, and we know it is not hygienic. We know that we will live a healthier lifestyle if we had potable water.”

Although Pa Olatunji offered directions to a river where majority of the community fetch water, he had left out the more important details of other activities at the same river. It is, for example, inside the same river that many inhabitants of Laaniba have their baths — that much was confirmed with the sight of two half-dressed women bathing at the river right in broad daylight.

In the dead of the night or the early mornings, it is unlikely that the bathing population at the river would be restricted to just two people. And it is unlikely, too, that the same river is not the people’s favourite defecation spot. The result s a chain of diseases that Pa Olatunji’s traditional roots may not recognize, but which exist all the same, as implicitly confirmed by John Joseph, a secondary school student in his early twenties.

We need a hospital in Laaniba, and it is very important, especially because of the kind of water we drink” Joseph pleaded. “When our people fall sick, our closest option is the clinic at Ajibode. Sometimes, the doctors are unavailable; at other times, it is the drugs that are not available, which leaves us with the difficult challenge of rushing sick people to town. You will agree with me that not all sick people will have the grace to endure such long trips to town without giving up the ghost on the way. That is why I said the provision of a hospital is very important.”

He also made a case for a secondary school in the town, saying, “I attend Ajibode Grammar School because all we have here is a primary school. Youths here do not attend school; so many of them just learn trades. And there are no jobs for them even at the end of their apprenticeships, so almost all of them resort to motorcycle riding. Somehow, I do not think that this is all that youths should be dissipating their energy and vigour into. But do they have a choice?”

Joseph’s claims were corroborated by Alhaji Ahmed Laaniba, another member of the Laaniba clan, who lamented the lack of government presence in the area for at least two decades.

Laaniba is supposed to be a town and not a village,” he lamented. “So, how is it possible that a town has no single source of pipe-borne water? I was born here and I am already over 70 years; the last time Akinyele Local Government did anything for us was more than 20 years ago. If the government will give us just potable water and stable electricity, we will be a happy people.”

At an earlier visit to the only primary school in Laaniba, not much was happening in the waterlogged classrooms in the single building, which itself only slightly bettered a typical abandoned building. A second adjoining buildingcollapsed several years ago, and there has been no effort from the government to raise it. The few pupils at the school cut a pitiable picture, many of them playing around while some fidgeted with their notebooks.

In the absence of the principal who was “away on an official assignment,” a teacher, Mrs. H. A. Abraham, conveyed the frustrations of the students and teachers with the run-down state of the school.

“This is a perfect example of how not to run a school,” she quipped. “There are no books, no instructional materials and no facilities. The classrooms are few so you cannot even talk of a toilet or source of potable water. There is a poor attitude among inhabitants towards education. The pupils do not understand English and I have to teach other subjects in Yoruba Language. The consequence is the production of pupils who graduate to secondary schools yet lack what it takes to compete with the rest of the world.”

The solution to the educational woes of the people of Laaniba, she noted, is to first develop the social amenities base of the community, and then watch the ripple effect on other areas of life.

“Without bringing development to Laaniba, these little children will have nothing to show for all the years in this primary school,” she said chillingly. “Without water, without electricity, without urban housing, without hospital, everything happening in the school will simply end up some nasty joke.”

 

 

The story is published under the pro poor WASH stories project implemented by the Water and Sanitation Media Network Nigeria, with the support of West Africa WASH Media Network, WaterAid, and Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council.

October 23, 2012

Ekiti state: Open defecation in Governor’s office!

      Adesina Wahab, Ado-Ekiti

Adesina Wahab, a correspondent with Compass Newspaper reports that the sanitary crises in Ado Ekiti, the capital town of Ekiti state,  South west Nigeria has reached alarming trend.

Most houses and offices do not have toilets and people urinate around the premises. Even in the Old Governor’s offices, along barracks Road, Ado-Ekiti, there are no toilets, and visitors have to walk across the road to defecate in the bush close to the Nigeria Union of Journalists secretariat or rush to a fast food joint located about a kilometre away.

Ekiti State Governor: Dr Kayode Fayemi

Poor sanitary conditions in some parts of Ekiti State, especially Ado-Ekiti, the state capital, is raising fear of a possible outbreak of water based diseases, investigations by our correspondent has revealed.

It will be recalled that the Ekiti State Government recently reported cholera outbreak in two towns, namely Igbara-Odo in Ekiti South-West Local Government Area and Ikere-Ekiti in Ikere Local Government Area.

The cholera outbreak in Igbara-Odo, according to the Ministry of Health, claimed two lives, while that of Ikere-Ekiti affected some people but left no casualty.

When the epidemic broke out in the two communities, the Commissioner for Health, Prof. Sola Fasubaa, advised the people of the state to observe and imbibe sound hygienic habits.

However, despite the call by the Commissioner, the situation in some areas in Ado-Ekiti is still pitiable as far as hygiene is concerned.

In Atikankan, Irona, Okeyinmi and many areas of the state capital, people still defecate in open places.

The storm water drainage in Atikankan area serves as the toilet, as most of the houses located there have no toilet facilities.

At any time of the day, people (both young and old) could be seen defecating in the drainage or pouring human waste there, despite the closeness of houses and food sellers of different sorts.

At Okeyinmi, the popular ‘Okuta n gbe okuta leri’ (rock) is serving as the toilet for hundreds of people leaving in the area, in spite of the fact that the rock is right in the centre of the town.

Findings also show that most houses in Oke-Ila, Okesa, Ojumose and others do not have toilet facilities, leaving residents to dump wastes in streams and drainages.

The situation is not different in most of the towns across the state and interestingly, some government offices are not better of, as they lack adequate toilet facilities.

For instance, the Old Governor’s Office, Barracks Road, Ado-Ekiti has become an eyesore, as the compound is left unkempt, because the Governor and Deputy governor have moved to new sites. Some of the offices also do not have toilets and people urinate around the premises.

For a visitor to the Old Governor’s offices, defecating may require going to the bush close to the Nigeria Union of Journalists secretariat or rushing to a fast food joint located about a kilometre away.

The indiscriminate dumping of refuse is also compounding the poor sanitary condition, as people are fond of dumping their refuse in  gutters, and this always lead to blocked drains whenever it rains.

The boss of the Ekiti State Waste Management Board, Mr. Adebayo Morakinyo, recently lamented the misuse of the waste bins placed in some places in the town.

He told journalists at a forum that some people go as afar as dumping human waste in the bins.

Ado Ekiti: The rock besides Governor’s office has turned to an open toilet

He also decried the poor response of people and even some corporate bodies to the use of bins put in their premises by private public participants in the waste management scheme of the state government.

Some people are resisting paying the token the operators are charging on a monthly basis, preferring to dump their wastes in open spaces and gutters.

The story is contributed by Adesina Wahab, and published under the pro poor WASH stories project implemented by the Water and Sanitation Media Network Nigeria, with the support of West Africa WASH Media Network, WaterAid, and Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council.

April 10, 2012

Report: FAME 2012 and the World Water Forum 2012

           By Babatope Babalobi who was in Marseilles

 

France’s second largest city- Marseilles, coordinates 43° 17′ 47.04″ N, 5° 22′ 12,   last month hosted two week long global meetings to discuss the challenges in the water and sanitation sector; specifically to identify management options that breeds inequity and crisis in water resource allocation and sanitation service delivery, and proffer solutions to prevent water related issues from causing a prophetic third world war.

Officially, what was supposed to be held in Marseille between March 11th and 17th    2012, was the World Water Forum (WWF), the sixth. Previous WWFs were held in Morocco 1997, Netherlands 2000, Japan 2003, Mexico 2006, and Turkey 2009.

The WWF is organised every three years by the World Water Council (WWC) which describes itself as a an international multi-stakeholder platform, established in 1996 “to promote awareness, build political commitment and trigger action on critical water issues at all levels, including the highest decision-making level, to facilitate the efficient conservation, protection, development, planning, management and use of water in all its dimensions on an environmentally sustainable basis for the benefit of all life on earth”.

Read more: http://assemblyonline.info/?p=16025

February 23, 2012

Millions lack access to WASH services in Liberia, Sierra Leone


                                                     By MUSTAPHA SESAY Mustaphasesay25@yahoo.com

What will the World be in the not too distant future if modalities are not put in place by World Leaders, Policy Makers, and Agencies towards  the deteriorating  situations of millions of deprived communities affected by lack of access to quality and affordable water, sanitation and hygiene?

As the adage goes, ‘when I see, I feel the plight of the situation, when I hear, I recall and when I touch, I am moved by the reality on the ground.’ This is exactly the situation of most slum communities and urban areas where the population exceeds the basic social amenities.

Taking a closer look at two post war countries; Sierra Leone and Liberia, one is bound to compare and contrast the deplorable slum situation between the two countries.

POOR SANITATION AT KROO BAY

One common feature is that Kroo Bay in Sierra Leone and West Point in Monrovia were places that housed thousands of internally displaced that fled the rural areas for the cities during the civil wars that ravaged the two countries. It was during that period that population explosion took place in urban areas there by ruining most of the facilities. After the war, most of the youths refused going back to their original places as some took up petty trading and established make shift structures as they had nothing to go back to.

MAKE SHIFT TOILETS AT WEST POINT

Despite promises by Governments of these countries to relocate these slum dwellers to safer and conducive places, yet this has not been feasible due to economic and political reasons.

Speaking to some elders and politicians, some of the factors responsible for the halting of such venture is that it is difficult to relocate a population of over thirty thousand to a site as the cost involved is so exorbitant as huge funds are needed for the relocated site to have basic facilities to prevent the people returning to their previous places.

Further more funds are not always available to ensure that the empty spaces left behind are utilized for developmental purposes. As a result, the criminals will utilize such places as their hide out that will pose security threat to the society.

Another worrisome issue discussed by most of the people in these slum communities is that most have stayed in those localities with children going to schools, so it becomes very difficult to move over to a new site.

Notwithstanding some of these views,  It is becoming clear that life in these two communities are plagued with diseases, pollution, environmental hazards as a result of the lack of water, sanitation and hygiene for the growing population.

On the area of sanitation, Kroo Bay has a stream flowing into the Atlantic Ocean, most of the house hold waste, and toilets are thrown into this stream. During the day children and pigs are seeing washing in the stream thus water born diseases are easily contracted

In the rainy season, the whole area is flooded as the water from the city is emptied into this area before getting into the ocean.  With this, there has been reported cases of flooding and loss of life and properties

Crime rate is high in this community simply because there is no proper building planning making it prone to fire disaster.

Unlike West Point   located on a peninsula  on the  Atlantic Ocean between the Mesurado and Saint Paul rivers that is resided by people from 14 West African countries .It is worth noting that this area is the main source of fish  but it is disheartening to see the deplorable nature of the community with a high rate illiteracy and without basic sanitation and health facilities. To worsen the situation, the community cannot boast of a single government clinic and a school to educate the children of basic hygiene and sanitation.

As a way of getting the view of the Commissioner of the area Sylvester Larno, WASH facilities in the town is one of the worst in the capital of Liberia.

Dilating on sanitation issue, Kroo Bay in Sierra Leone is far better than as compared to West Point, the reason being that some of the houses have toilets and there is a public toilet that is decent unlike West Point with a few make shift toilets. And even with that, only those who can afford money will have to make use of the structures while the poor practice open defecation to the disadvantage of the population. There are times youths do clean their areas and the major street making it accessible to most of the social facilities in the city.

Pure drinking water is accessible as tap water and wells could be visible, while at West point, it is the opposite as residents have to walk miles, buy plastic water or drink the unhygienic water that is closer to defecation centres.

SCRAMBLE  FOR WATER IN SLUM COMMUNITY

Some common features about slum communities are that they characteristic of overcrowding that are prone to epidemic diseases. This in return will affect the health status of the population. There is no privacy and most of the children grow up with bad attitudes in life. During the rains, flooding is the order of the day in these areas closer to the sea.

Notwithstanding these menace, improving sanitation, water and hygienic facilities will curtail the spread of diseases. There is need for regular sanitization and awareness programmes on these issues. Some of the youths should be provided with skill training jobs so that with livelihood, they can look out for decent places to stay.

February 22, 2012

Babalobi Babatope, Secretary General WASH-JN, speaks during the General Assembly 2012 in Monrovia, Liberia, on the role of the network and individual journalists to bring about change in WASH services delivery and access

February 17, 2012

Residents of Clara town cry for help

“We are dying of diarrhea and cholera. We are also dysentery and malaria. We appeal to government agencies, charities and civil society organizations to come to our aid”.

Clara town located on Bushrod Island, a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia became famous for being the birthplace of Liberian football star George Oppong Weah Clara town. In recent years, the community is attracting global attention for its poor, inadequate and over stretched sanitation facilities, unsafe drinking water supply, decrepit drainages, and poor hygiene practices.

Clara Town has a population of 48,000 with 967 fully built up houses (and another 967 unfinished houses) inhabited by 12,335 women and 11,730 men, people, according to a community census exercise.
Access to water, sanitation, and hygiene services is generally poor in Liberia including its capital city Monrovia.
Facilities have generally old and deteriorated no thanks to a 14 year old civil war.

Statistics are also unreliable, but a 2009 story by Allwestafrica.com http://www.allwestafrica.com/241120092550.html reports that “just one-third of Monrovia’s 1.5 million residents have access to clean toilets, and 20 to 30 cholera cases are reported weekly; in 2008 there were 888 suspected cases, 98 percent of them in Monrovia’s overcrowded shantytowns such as West Point, Buzzi Quarter, Clara Town, and Sawmill”

February 15, 2012

AG WASH-JN A MONROVIA « C’EST TRES BON »

L’assemblée générale du WASH-JN se déroule à Monrovia au Liberia du 12 au 17 Février 2012. Les journalistes délégués qui y participent ont célébré la St Valentin en séance de travail. L’agenda de la journée à l’Hôtel Mamba-Point l’un des hôtels requis par les partenaires prévoyait la suite des présentations des rapports nationaux et les questions de gouvernance au sein du Conseil de Coordination. Un autre point à l’agenda non officiel aura été la célébration de la St Valentin.
La journée a commencée avec de très intéressantes présentations des expériences et exploits des différents pays à la suite de la vague dont les présentations ont eu cours, le jour

1. La seconde phase de la journée prévoyait les questions de gouvernance et d’administration au sein du CC.

La séance a été présidée par le Coordinateur Régional.

Des échanges qui ont suivis son exposé, il a été manifeste les manquements du Bureau et les difficultés sur le plan fonctionnel et organisationnel. Il a été reconnu le travail impressionnant accompli par le SG durant cette année et suggéré que la rémunération lui soit accordée d’après ses propositions faites a Mumbai en Inde.

Les membres du CC reconnaissant l’absence des résultats ont par ailleurs émis à l’AG des propositions. Elles sont allées du remplacement de la Secrétaire a la Communication et a l’Information (poste revenant au Mali et vaquant du fait de la démission verbale de la tenante) en passant par le recrutement d’un administrateur ou d’un secrétaire rémunéré et la démission proposé expressément par le Coordinateur en poste.

Les réactions des délégués et du CC n’ont pas permis de trouver une position commune tel que prévu par les Statuts, cependant il a été décidé qu’avant la fin de la session des résolutions seraient prises.
Le climat a été un peu tendu pendant les travaux du fait de ces débats sur la gouvernance et sur l’administration. Une séance de projection photos proposée spontanément par la déléguée de la Cote d’Ivoire a permis de détendre l’atmosphère. Donnant ainsi l’occasion de célébrer la fête des amoureux de différentes manières.

Par groupes de deux ou trois les uns ont fait une brève visite dans les rues, d’autres ont fait quelques pas sur le sable de la plage longeant l’hôtel. D’autres par contre se sont offerts une sortie galante ou encore un shopping de formalité. La troisième journée se voudra tout aussi intéressante que pratique.

Elle permettra la descente sur le terrain et la visite de quelques sites, puis une session de formation sur quelques techniques de collectes d’information et de diffusion a l’aide des nouveaux medias. L’on se plaira d’entendre dire a la fin, « C’est très bon »
Eddy Patrick DONKENG.
donkengeddy@gmail.com
CAMERWASH

February 3, 2012

The current water situation in Brong-Ahafo Region in Ghan

The surest way to improve the quality of life of the people is improving access to quality water especially in rural communities.

Clean water is essential to health.

Though Ghana has signed up to achieving the targets set under the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which cuts across all sectors of the country’s development agenda, access to potable drinking water is still a daunting problem in some communities in Brong-Ahafo.

Under the MDGs target for water, it is expected that Ghana will have provided access to 78 percent of the population with improved water by the year 2015.

By the end of 2010, about 62 percent of the more than 22 million of Ghana’s population had access to improved drinking water supply.The provisional figures from the 2010 population census put Brong-Ahafo at 2,282,128. The implication is that the population is steadily increasing but water resources cannot support the increase in the region throughout the year.

The borehole success rate of 52 percent is also relatively low. Access to potable water in rural areas in the region is 53.61 percent.

This unfortunately is below the national average of 62 percent. This is why Brong-Ahafo must be one of the government’s focal areas for improvement.

Research has shown that the region requires more than 2,243 new boreholes in communities with population within the range of 75 to 2000 people. To achieve this objective requires dedication and tenacity of purpose.

It is therefore incumbent on development partners, NGOs, Water and Sanitation practitioners and indeed every body to religiously apply him/herself to ensure that all the people in the region gain access to potable water.

This is because water is everybody’s business.

January 18, 2012

Jon Lane appelle à davantage d’investissements dans l’assainissement

Jon Lane, Directeur exécutif du Conseil de concertation pour l’approvisionnement en eau et l’assainissement (WSSCC):  « Le chemin pour attirer plus de fonds vers l’assainissement, c’est d’être capable d’expliquer aux chefs d’Etats, que le financement de l’assainissement est un investissement économique important»

Pour la première fois au monde, un forum a été exclusivement consacré aux questions d’hygiène et d’assainissement. Rencontré à ce forum qui s’est tenu du 9 au 14 octobre 2011 à Mumbai, en Inde, le Directeur exécutif du Conseil de concertation pour l’approvisionnement en eau et l’assainissement (WSSCC), cheville ouvrière de la tenue de ce forum, revient sur les enjeux de ce rendez-vous historique, la stratégie pour faire de l’hygiène et de l’assainissement une priorité dans nos Etats et enfin, il insiste sur la nécessité de promouvoir le partage d’expériences et de savoir-faire entre les acteurs de ce secteur.

 Est-ce qu’il était vraiment nécessaire de consacrer un forum exclusivement à l’hygiène et l’assainissement?

Il y a eu beaucoup de réunions et conférences sur l’eau et l’assainissement mais le problème c’est que pendant ces réunions tout le monde parle de l’eau mais pas de l’assainissement. Donc, nous avions pensé qu’il était très important de consacrer cette réunion spécialement à l’assainissement et à l’hygiène, de sorte qu’on puisse se concentrer essentiellement sur ces deux sujets.

Aujourd’hui, que répondez-vous à ceux qui pensent qu’un forum, c’est une longue suite de discours  et qu’à la fin on n’a rien de concret ? Est-ce que vous pensez qu’on va sortir avec des propositions  concrètes ?

Souvent, on dit des réunions globales qu’il ne ressort pas des actions concrètes. Mais le WSSCC a organisé ce forum spécialement pour des buts pratiques au profit des professionnels qui travaillent vraiment dans des programmes d’assainissement afin de leur permettrede se rencontrer, de communiquer entre eux et d’apprendre des expériences pratiques des uns et des autres. Vous n’allez pas entendre au cours de cette conférenceun discours politique, des déclarations ou opinions officielles qui ne tiennent pas compte de cette réalité. Nous avons axé ce Forum sur la rencontre entre les équipes des projets afin qu’elles apprennent de leur travail respectif.

Nous avons suivi des gens magnifiques qui sont passionnés quand ils parlent de l’assainissement et qui ont fait beaucoup de choses merveilleuses. Comment votre organisation compte faire pour créer une dynamique de partage d’expériences et d’énergie surtout ?

Le WSSCC est une organisation d’adhésion. Donc, nous encourageons tous ceux qui viennent aux réunions à devenir membre, l’une des composantes de la grande famille du WSSCC. Aussi, nous avons un grand nombre de mécanismes pour maintenir le contact entre les rencontres. Par exemple, notre site web a une page consacrée à nos membres, où ils peuvent avoir des discussions, poster des commentaires, des documents et d’autres entre eux. Nous encourageons aussi les gens à former des groupes, pas seulement dans leur pays, mais aussi entre différents pays. Par exemple, des professionnels du Bénin peuvent s’associer avec ceux d’autres pays pour développer un sujet spécifique. Ainsi, nous pourrons les aider à maintenir le dialogue par mail ou par téléphone au niveau du site web. Cela leur permettra de continuer à dialoguer et à discuter entre eux sur ce sujet. Ils n’ont pas besoin de se rencontrer en personne. Mais, grâce à ces mécanismes de communication, ils pourront continuer leur dialogue.

Le plus grand défi aujourd’hui pour les acteurs qui travaillent dans le secteur de l’hygiène

January 18, 2012

L’EAU POTABLE DENRÉE RARE A ABIDJAN!!!!

Depuis plus de deux semaines les populations d’Abidjan notamment, celles des communes de la cité sir de Cocody, route de BINGERVILLE ( banlieue d’Abidjan) et celle de la plus grande commune d’Abidjan, Yopougon, souffre de manque d’eu potable.

January 12, 2012

WASH-JN’s story competition


The West Africa Water and Sanitation Journalists Network (WASH-JN) is a regional network of Journalists reporting the Water supply and Sanitation sector for various mass media in 13 West African Countries– Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Togo.

 

Its strategic objective include amplifying and  production of compelling reports on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) focusing in particular on poor people’s perspectives in order to achieve increased attention from all citizens and decision makers.

 

Towards fulfilling this objective, the WASH-JN  hereby invites Journalists to submit compelling WASH stories for publication on the WASH-JN’s blog   www.wash-jn.net.

 

An Honorarium will be paid for the  best news stories published on the Blog.

 

December 7, 2011

Forum de Haut Niveau sur le secteur de l’Eau et de l’Assainissement

Forum de Haut Niveau sur le secteur de l’Eau et de l’Assainissement à Ouagadougou.

Prévue pour quatre jours, ce forum est organisé par le CREPA (Centre Africain pour l’Eau Potable et l’Assainissement). Cette rencontre d’échanges de haut niveau réunit une multitude d’acteurs et des décideurs du secteur  sans oublier les partenaires au développement et les ministres  ou encore les officiels de part le continent. Ce rendez vous sera  marqué par la tenue d’un atelier Africain  sur la tarification des services d’eau et d’assainissement, un dialogue ministériel, une table ronde des bailleurs de fonds et le lancement d’un Forum Africain sur les solutions locales innovantes dans le secteur  de l’Eau, l’Hygiène et l’assainissement.

Soulignons que cette réunion se tient en prélude aux évènements majeurs notamment le forum mondial de l’eau à Marseille et la réunion des Ministres des finances et de l’eau à Washington et cette réunion va également aider à harmoniser la position de l’Afrique en direction de ces évènements  mondiaux.

Au total vingt quatre pays sont représentés à cette rencontre. Parmi ceux-ci, on note la présence des états de l’Afrique Centrale et des Grands lacs. L’on peut citer le Caméroun, le Gabon, le Congo Brazzaville, la République Centrafricaine, le Rwanda, le Burundi et le Tchad.

L’Afrique de l’Ouest est aussi fortement représentée. A l’Exception de la Gambie et du Cap Vert, tous les pays sont présents : Bénin, Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinée Bissau, Ghana, Guinée Conacry, Libéria, Mali, Mauritanie, Sénégal, Sierra Léone et Togo.

Le Mozambique et Madagascar représentent l’Afrique Australe. Au niveau de l’Afrique du Nord, seule  l’Algérie est présente.

François Koami

December 4, 2011

GWP convenes dialogue on West Africa groundwater management

The Global Water Partnership (GWP) West Africa recently held a consultation on the “Joint management of groundwater in West Africa” in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Insufficient knowledge of groundwater quantity and quality necessitates the need for a regional dialogue can contribute to better management of the resource in the West African region, says Mr. Dam Nanfan Mogbante, Regional Coordinator,  GWP-West Africa


“For two years GWP West Africa has engaged in a process that has led some of its partners, such as UNESCO, to convene meetings with, among others, GEF, OSS, and AfDB, to reach a consensus on the process towards a regional dialogue. has ten aquifers and some countries have no other alternative water resources than groundwater”

Opening the  Ouagadougou meeting, the representative of the Minister of Agriculture and Hydraulics of Burkina, said the gathering will “look for necessary synergies to initiate a regional dialogue on the joint management of groundwater in West Africa”; adding that  “such a dialogue, if launched, should induce effective uptake of groundwater in national and regional water management policies (at the level of state, regional integration organizations, Basin Organizations), paying particular attention to transboundary aquifers. This great initiative of Global Water Partnership and its partners is to be welcomed and encouraged”.

Several presentations were made during the dialogue with experience sharing from other regions, including India, and fruitful debates followed. Three working groups came up with guidelines which will be incorporated as recommendations, and a roadmap for the regional dialogue. ECOWAS’s Water Resources Coordination Center is supporting the process including the Interstate Committee to fight drought in the Sahel (CILSS) and the West Africa Monetary and Economic Union (UEMOA). Financial support of the regional workshop came from the UN Economic Commission for Africa’s Climate Policy Center (ACPC), FAO, UEMOA and GWP West Africa

 

 

 

 

October 28, 2011

A cause d’un mauvais assainissement: Le Bénin perd 52 milliards de FCFA par an

By Alain TOSSOUNON

 

La facture est salée et les résultats de l’étude documentaire faite par le Programme eau et assainissement(WSC), un partenariat multi-bailleurs administré par la Banque Mondiale pour aider les pauvres à obtenir un accès sûr et durable aux services d’eau et d’assainissement, sont accablants. Il y a urgence.

 

Ce n’est pas une imagination. C’est bien une réalité. Le Bénin perd 52 milliards de francs CFA chaque année à cause d’un mauvais assainissement.  Ce qui équivaut  à 1,5% du PIB national. La raison, même si elle est surprenante est toute simple. A ce jour, 2,5 millions de Béninois utilisent des latrines insalubres ou partagées et  5,2 millions  de Béninois n’ont pas de latrines du tout et font leurs besoins en plein air. Des chiffres qui paraissent irréalistes à première vue mais qui sont bien vrais.

 

Parce que selon les statistiques nationales notamment, les chiffres de la revue 2010 des secteurs de l’eau et de l’assainissement, seulement 44,4% des ménages ont accès à un assainissement adéquat au plan national. Ainsi, plus de la moitié des Béninois pratiquent la défécation à l’air ou partagent des latrines avec les autres.

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